Axial XR10 Rear Axle Assembly Tips and Precautions

By Axial Staff on Aug 16, 2010

With the XR10′s starting to arrive in the hands of our loyal consumers, I figured it would be a good time to share some tips, tricks, and precautions on the rear axle assembly.

The most important thing to take note of is the specific hardware and length used on the rear axle. Not following the instructions exactly can cause failure of the final gears. The most critical are steps 20 & 23. Specifically the location of AXA466 and AXA465.

Step 20

Step 23

Installing AXA466 at the location circled in Green. Note the 12mm Length

Installing AXA465 at the location circled in Green. Note the 10mm Length

Installing AXA466 at the location circled in Green. Note the 12mm Length

Installing the AXA466 M3x12 Flathead at the incorrect location will actually puncture through the inside of the AX80065 “1″ upper rear axle housing. This is pictured below, the AXA466 has been installed at the incorrect location that requires a AXA465. This is circled in RED showing the potential issue.

Everything looks “ok” from the outside.

Note that the screw is now going to interfere with the 15×21 bearings (AXA1243) and the 36T Final Gear (AX30552).

This can cause a few issues:

  • The most critical one being the center-to-center distance on the gears. When this distance increases, you decrease the contact on the teeth. The less teeth in contact, the higher the load will be on these gears.
  • Another issue is the 15×21 outer bearing race  being smashed by using the incorrect hardware. This can cause the bearing to fail by creating a lot of strain on the entire rear axle.  Hopefully these pictures will help you guys prevent this from happening.

The other important thing to check during the rear axle assembly is the clamping hardware on the back of the housing. Make sure to get these as tight as possible without stripping the upper plastic that holds the 3mm locking nut. If these are not fully tightened the rear axle case may flex allowing the center to center distance on the gears increase – this causes a decrease in the contact of the teeth.

Just to clarify, here is a diagram of the “center-to-center” distance on the final gears that I mentioned above. As you can see, when this distance increases, the gears are not as effective at transferring the torque of the motors.

This is the ideal center to center distance with the correct tooth contact.

Here is the potential danger if the gears are allowed to separate. Notice the minimal tooth contact.

UPDATE! 9-17-10:  Please be sure to always install AX30559 XR10 Rear axle plate.  It plays a crucial part of the strength of the rear axle.  The screws holding this plate on are the main clamping bearings on the 5×8 bearing on the end of the AX30196 5×58 Gear Shaft.  You must run this plate and the correct screws.  Instant gear failure will occur without this plate installed.

I hope this helps clarify the above steps and shows the importance of using the correct hardware on the rear axle.  Please feel free to ask questions.

 



3 Comments:

  1. Default_avatar RJD Posted on 2010-08-17 11:34:29

    Could you please tell us with how many Newton Meters we have to tighten those screws?

  2. Default_avatar RJD Posted on 2010-09-02 10:22:25

    Hello Axial Engineers…. More Information Pease…

  3. Default_avatar NC Posted on 2012-01-22 11:35:20

    Hey, can you guys update the post since the instructions show to use an AXA467 (left), AXA465 (center) and AXA465 (right) now?

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